Short Excerpt

Chapter Founders

  • Dr. George C Simkins
    Dr. George C Simkins
    9/21/1885 - 6/11/1958
  • WL Jones
    WL Jones
  • Williams B. Windsor
    Williams B. Windsor
    12/26/1879 - 8/27/1932
  • Dr. Gurney Elliott Nelson
    Dr. Gurney Elliott Nelson
    5/17/1892 - 12/21/1952
  • Dr. Charles Constantine Stewart
    Dr. Charles Constantine Stewart
    9/8/1885 - 10/7/1952
  • Dr. Walter Lewis McNair
    Dr. Walter Lewis McNair
  • Dr. Francis L. Atkins
    Dr. Francis L. Atkins
    12/6/1896- 1/26/1982

Dr. George C Simkins
9/21/1885 - 6/11/1958

Bro. George Simkins, DDS, a dentist in Greensboro, NC, was a leader in the black community

WL Jones

Was Tau Omega 1st KRS and Principal of Lincoln junior high school in Greensboro, NC

Williams B. Windsor
12/26/1879 - 8/27/1932

Bro. William Blackstone Windsor was the superintendent of negro schools in Guilford County.  Died in a car accident.  The Windsor community recreation center is named in his honor.

Dr. Gurney Elliott Nelson
5/17/1892 - 12/21/1952

Dean Gurney E. Nelson is a native of Greensboro, North Carolina, where he received his early academic training in the city schools and at Bennett College.  He received the B. S. degree from Johnson Smith University and the A. B. degree from Lincoln University (Penn.) Dean Nelson pursued graduate training at the University of Chicago and at Ohio State University. From the latter institution he received the M. A. degree in 1928.  In 1936-37 he was a General Education Board Fellow at Ohio State University, and in 1941 he completed the residence requirements for the Ph. D. degree.  Positions held by Dean Nelson include: Principal of Miller Memorial School, Birmingham, Alabama, Lieutenant of Infantry, World War I, principal Washington Street School, Greensboro, N. C., Professor of Psychology, State Teachers College, Montgomery, Alabama (Summer Sessions ) and Dean of Benedict College in Columbia, SC from, 1945 to 1951.  Dean Nelson organized the Benedict-Allen Summer session, and has served as its director for some years.  He was appointed by the Department of Education of South Carolina as the official examiner for the State High School Certificate.  He was appointed by the Carnegie Foundation, New York and the College Entrance Board, New Jersey,  respectively to administer the Graduate Record Examination and Navy College Aptitude Test in this area.  He is also psychometrist for the Veterans Administration Guidance Center No. 3019.  In civic affairs, he treasurer of the South Carolina Colored Fair Association; member of the executive board of Southern Regional Council; member of executive committee South Carolina N.A.A.C.P., etc.  He is a founding member of the Tau Omega Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity.  Some of his writings which have appeared in “School and Society,” Educational Administration and Supervision, The journal of Education and other periodicals include: “The Adaptation of Instruction to Local Conditions”;  “Improving the Status of the Negro Teacher”; “Experience in Adapting Student Teaching and Extension Service to Emergency Conditions.”

Dr. Charles Constantine Stewart
9/8/1885 - 10/7/1952

One of these successful physicians and surgeons is Dr. Charles Constantine Stewart of Greensboro. Dr. Stewart is a native of Jamaica where he was born on Sept. 8, 1885. His father, Chas. J. Stewart, was a teacher, and his mother’s maiden name was Miss Agnes Sangster. His paternal grandfather was Chas. Stewart and his maternal grand-mother was Rebecca Sangster.

Dr. Stewart laid the foundation of his education in the free schools of Jamaica. He came to the States in 1905. He matriculated in the medical department of Howard University for his medical course and won his M. D. degree in 1911. This was followed by one year as Intern at the Freedman’s Hospital in Washington after which he settled down to the regular practice. In 1913 he located at Greensboro where he has since resided and where he has built up a good practice. He gives special attention to surgery and is superintendent of the local hospital. He is also Sec. and Treas. of The Gate City Drug Co., Inc.

On Nov. 27, 1914, Dr. Stewart was married to Mrs. Anna Bulloch of Greensboro.

Dr. Stewart has no visionary ideas about success. He considers the biggest factors in his own career economy, honesty and careful attention to details in business and profession. He believes that the surest way to progress for the race is the encouragement of race loyalty, economy and honesty. Dr. Stewart is a member of the M. E. church and is identified with the Masons and the Elks.

In January of 1923, a group of individuals met and organized the Greensboro Negro Hospital Association.  Shortly afterwards a charter was formed of seventy-two members. A Board of Directors consisting of an equal number of white and black individuals were formed. Dr. Charles Constantine Stewart was one of the founding members of the Board of Directors.

Dr. Walter Lewis McNair

Dr. Walter Lewis McNair, a druggist of Greensboro, is one of those sturdy men who by patient perseverance and hard work has won a measure of success in his chosen profession which is a credit to him and to his native State. He was born at Hamlet in Richmond Co., on Nov. 4, 1868. His father, Camus McNair, was a farmer. He was a loyal and trusted servant. Even after the war he managed the estate of his mistresses until they all passed away, some fifteen or more years after emancipation. Later came business reverses, the result of inefficient management. Under these conditions, the subject of our sketch was doomed to years of hard work with little pay. Dr. McNair’s mother was, before her marriage, Rebecca McMillian. His paternal grandmother was Jane McNair. His mother’s father was Rev. James McMillian, who lived in Columbia, S. C.

Young McNair laid the foundation of his education in the public schools of Laurinburg, but when he aspired to a higher education the way was not easy. He went to work for an elder brother who promised to see him through school. His never got beyond the stage of promises, so it was not strange that the boy broke away and began working for himself. He worked at whatever offered and saved his money. He entered the preparatory department of Biddle University and remained in that institution for four years.

Having decided to take up pharmacy, he matriculated at the Leonard School of Pharmacy, Shaw University, where he won his Ph. G. degree in 1897. He was engaged in Raleigh for a while and then went into the Spanish-American War as a hospital steward. On his return, he went into the drug business for himself in Greensboro, where he has since resided and prospered. He has an up-to-date, attractive store on East Market Street.

Looking back now over the days of his boyhood and youth he is of the opinion that the greatest single factor in shaping his life and giving right direction to his thinking was his early attendance and love of the Sunday School.

Dr. McNair has been married twice. On Aug. 15, 1900, he was married to Miss Rosa Jones, a daughter of Adam and Rebecca Jones. They had two children, Walter L., Jr., and Cecil McNair. In 1906 the mother of these children passed away. On Jan. 8, 1908, Dr. McNair was married to Miss Roxie E. Brooks of Danville, Va. Their children are James, Kermit, Wilber and Gurney McNair.

Dr. McNair is a prominent lay member of the Presbyterian Church, with which he has been identified since boy hood. He has been an elder in the church for a number of years and has twice been a commissioner to the Presbyterian General Assembly, which is the highest court of the denomination. He is now asst. Supt. of his local S. S.

He is active in the work of the secret and benevolent societies and also in state and local civic organizations. He belongs to the Masons, Pythians, Eastern Star, Court of Calanthe and the Elks. He is Vice President of the local building and loan association and also Vice President of the N. C. State Fair and Industrial Association.

He is recognized as a conservative business man and stands well with both his white and colored neighbors. His work has been of the constructive sort and few of his neighbors in his boyhood days would have been bold enough to have predicted the successful business career to which he has attained.

Dr. Francis L. Atkins
12/6/1896- 1/26/1982

Francis Loguen Atkins was born December 6, 1896, in Winston-Salem, NC, the fifth of six sons and three daughters, to Simon Green Atkins and Oleona Pegram Atkins. His parents, Simon and Oleona, founded Slater Industrial Academy (now Winston-Salem State University) located in Winston-Salem, NC, in 1892. Atkins received his early education at Slater Industrial Academy and State Normal School and grew up in the all Black community of Columbian Heights, an enclave of professionals, craftsmen, and artisans. In 1920 Atkins graduated as class valedictorian from Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) with the Bachelor of Arts degree. In his senior year at Lincoln, he had intentions to attend Yale to study for a career in the Christian ministry. But, following graduation he was asked by Slater Industrial Academy and State Normal School board of trustee chairman, Henry E. Fries to return to Winston-Salem and assist his father Simon Green Atkins. In this capacity F. L. Atkins taught classes and served as assistant principal of Columbian Heights High School. In 1924 Atkins received the Master of Art degree from Columbia University, where he managed to complete residence requirements and the matriculation examination for the Doctoral degree.  Tau Omega’s first documented Basileus and the brother of Jasper Alston Atkins, 9th Grand Basileus